Eating for the season AND the environment.


I’m sure you have all heard of fruits and vegetables being “in season”. This mainly relates to the foods that can be grown/farmed in your local areas. One good example is CORN. Corn of course is available for harvest and sale in the warmer (summer/early fall) months of the year. When you buy from a local farmer you are supporting your local vendors which cuts down on so many harmful side effects to our economy, health and environment.

The top reasons for shopping locally are:

Taste local or regional and hence fresher, food.
Enjoy mouth-watering, tasty delicious foods that are available in-season only.
Buy a variety of specialty foods that will impress your dinner guests.
Discover a wide variety of “new” specialty products that offer new tastes and flavours.
Enjoy foods produced with fewer chemicals thus protecting the your health and the environment.
Support farmers who are committed to the humane treatment of animals.
Seek out foods produced in a unique way.
Meet the farmer who grows your food and ask them for details on how the product was produced.
Pick up some cooking tips and recipes from Chefs and Producers.
Purchase foods at the market and support the future of family farms and food security in British Columbia.
Reduce your carbon-imprint by walking or cycling to your community farmers’ market.
Connect with your neighbours and community.

WHAT SEASON ARE WE IN? – SEE BELOW:

What’s In Season
“To Everything There Is A Season”
What’s in season in November?
Apples, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Garlic, Leeks, Onions (cooking), Pears, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Turnips, Winter Squash.

What’s in season in December?
Apples, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Garlic, Pears, Rosemary, Sage, Turnips, Winter Squash.

What’s in season in January?
Apples, Cabbage, Pears, Rosemary, Sage, Turnips, Winter Squash.

What’s in season in February?
Apples, Cabbage, Pears, Rosemary, Sage, Turnips.

What’s in season in March?
Apples, Pears, Rosemary, Sage.

What’s in season in April?
Apples, Chives, Pears, Rhubarb, Rosemary, Sage, Spinach.

What’s in season in May?
Apples, Chives, Radish, Rhubarb, Rosemary, Sage, Spinach, Turnips.

What’s in season in June?
Apples, Cauliflower, Cherries, Chinese Vegetables, Chives, Cilantro, Lettuce, Peas, Potatoes, Radish, Rhubarb, Rosemary, Sage, Salad Greens, Spinach, Strawberries, Thyme, Turnips.

What’s in season in July?
Apricots, Basil, Beans, Beets, Blueberries, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cherries, Chinese Vegetables, Chives, Cilantro, Cucumbers, Kale, Lettuce, Peas, Peppers, Potatoes, Radish, Raspberries, Rhubarb, Rosemary, Sage, Salad Greens, Spinach, Strawberries, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Thyme, Turnips.

What’s in season in August?
Apples, Apricots, Basil, Beans, Beets, Blackberries, Blueberries, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chinese Vegetables, Chives, Cilantro, Corn, Cucumbers, Currants, Garlic, Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Onions (sweet), Peaches, Pears, Peppers, Plums, Potatoes, Radish, Raspberries, Rosemary, Sage, Salad Greens, Shallots, Spinach, Strawberries, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Thyme, Turnips.

What’s in season in September?
Apples, Basil, Beans, Beets, Blackberries, Blueberries, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chinese Vegetables, Chives, Cilantro, Corn, Cucumbers, Currants, Garlic, Kale, Lettuce, Leeks, Melons, Onions (sweet), Onions (cooking), Pears, Peppers, Plums, Potatoes, Pumpkins, Radish, Raspberries, Rosemary, Sage, Salad Greens, Shallots, Spinach, Strawberries, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Thyme, Turnips, Winter Squash.

What’s in season in October?
Apples, Beans, Beets, Blackberries, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chives, Cilantro, Corn, Cranberries, Garlic, Kale, Lettuce, Leeks, Onions (sweet), Onions (cooking), Pears, Peppers, Potatoes, Pumpkins, Radishes, Rosemary, Sage, Salad Greens, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Thyme, Turnips, Winter Squash.

Product Season
APPLES AUGUST – JUNE
APRICOTS JULY – AUGUST
BASIL JULY – SEPTEMBER
BEANS JULY – OCTOBER
BEETS JULY – OCTOBER
BLACKBERRIES AUGUST – OCTOBER
BLUEBERRIES JULY – SEPTEMBER
BROCCOLI JULY – OCTOBER
BRUSSELS SPROUTS OCTOBER – DECEMBER
CABBAGE JULY – FEBRUARY
CARROTS JULY – NOVEMBER
CAULIFLOWER JUNE – NOVEMBER
CELERY JULY – OCTOBER
CHERRIES JUNE – JULY
CHINESE VEGETABLES JUNE – SEPTEMBER
CHIVES APRIL – OCTOBER
CILANTRO JUNE – OCTOBER
CORN AUGUST – OCTOBER
CRANBERRIES OCTOBER
CUCUMBERS JULY – SEPTEMBER
CURRANTS AUGUST – SEPTEMBER
GARLIC AUGUST – DECEMBER
KALE JULY – OCTOBER
LETTUCE JUNE – OCTOBER
LEEKS SEPTEMBER – NOVEMBER
MELONS AUGUST – SEPTEMBER
ONIONS (SWEET) AUGUST – OCTOBER
ONIONS (COOKING) SEPTEMBER – NOVEMBER
PEACHES AUGUST
PEARS AUGUST – APRIL
PEAS JUNE – JULY
PEPPERS JULY – OCTOBER
PLUMS AUGUST – SEPTEMBER
POTATOES JUNE – OCTOBER
PUMPKINS SEPTEMBER – OCTOBER
RADISH MAY – OCTOBER
RASPBERRIES JULY – SEPTEMBER
RHUBARB APRIL – JULY
ROSEMARY YEAR ROUND
SAGE YEAR ROUND
SALAD GREENS JUNE – OCTOBER
SHALLOTS AUGUST – SEPTEMBER
SPINACH APRIL – SEPTEMBER
STRAWBERRIES JUNE – SEPTEMBER
SUMMER SQUASH JULY – AUGUST
SWISS CHARD JULY – OCTOBER
TOMATOES JULY – OCTOBER
THYME JUNE – NOVEMBER
TURNIPS MAY – FEBRUARY
WINTER SQUASH MID SEPTEMBER – DECEMBER

Eating for your future

Summer is here and it brings with it abundance and appreciation for the out of doors and all it’s infinite wisdom. This includes all of the human beings that may in fact be contributing to the eventual destruction of this beautiful, ever loyal rock we call home.

Being a person who has chosen to forego having a family certainly helps when making basic, selfish decisions in life. Most parents you speak to at one time or another could agree that they have felt a twinge of envy when watching the unencumbered go about their regular daily routine, not realizing how difficult jetting out to grab a jug of juice can be with the additional burden of a dependent. Family or not, the Earth is my dependent, and I am solely responsible for my impact on its fragile ecosystem.

Part of our shared responsibility is to educate ourselves, our friends and our families about the foundations of a healthier planet. It starts with the food we eat. What most people do not consider is the impact that factory farming has on our health. The mass production of meat, GMO’s and food that crisscrosses the globe to get to our dinner plate, are deadly contributors to our eventual demise in the form of toxic pollutants and cancer to name a few.

This summer, take advantage of farmers markets in your area. You can find artisan meats, cheeses, fruits and vegetables all harvested within one hundred or so kilometers of your own back yard.

http://www.eatlocal.org/

Lastly, pick up a book or search the internet to find out more about what you can do to help maintain and improve the planets ability to keep us all fed and healthy. Learn about the big business of food, pharmaceuticals and your role in it all.

http://www.michaelpollan.com/omnivore.php
http://www.eatinganimals.com/

To your health.